Fire and Myofascial dry cupping, also known as cupping therapy, is a treatment technique that places glass, bamboo, or plastic jars on the skin to enhance circulation, relieve pain, and extract toxins from the body. You may be familiar with Myofascial Cupping using suction to enhance blood flow but we also use Fire Cupping, creating suction with heat!

If you watched the 2016 Rio Olympic Games you would have seen American athletes like Michael Phelps sporting circular red marks on their backs, shoulders, and arms during the event.

What is Cupping?

Cupping is an alternative, non-invasive treatment technique that uses special cups placed on the skin to encourage blood flow to damaged areas. This unique therapy is often recommended to patients who suffer from muscular pain, joint pain, skin problems, and/or respiratory disorders.

What to Expect During Fire Cupping

During treatment, a physical therapist puts a flammable substance inside of a glass or silicone cup before lighting it on fire. The physical therapist allows the fire to go out before placing it on the skin. The cup is left on the skin for a few minutes, creating a suction that causes your skin to rise and redden within the cup. This process causes your blood vessels to expand, encouraging blood flow and increased circulation to the damaged area(s).

While fire cupping may be recommended to patients with specific musculoskeletal conditions, it is ideal for any patient who wishes to heal his or her soft tissue injuries and reduce overall pain and inflammation.

Our Therapist Kate practices complete safety and sanitation when performing this treatment. Moreover, our team performs the most effective, common, and proven method of fire cupping.

Common things we treat with Cupping:

  • Arthritis
  • muscle pain and injury
  • chronic pain
  • Fibromyalgia
  • High blood pressure
  • Migraines
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Varicose veins
  • Cold and Flu, Bronchitis

Although fire cupping is deemed a safe procedure, side effects can still arise. Patients may experience mild discomfort, and skin appear bruised after treatment. This is all normal and part of the healing process.